Week Two Resilience Challenge: Goals Part One - Juggle Jobs

Week Two Resilience Challenge: Goals Part One

Part One: Finding Purpose

Welcome to week two of our five-week resilience challenge. This week we’re focusing on setting goals and finding purpose to help you have more direction in life, and to help you navigate through covid19 and any impact it may have made. Our goal is to help provide tools for you to be in a better position to get through 2020, stronger. 

You may have already set yourself goals at the beginning of the year, perhaps you’ve been working towards a particular accomplishment for a while now, or you have an idea of where you want to get to in life but haven’t made any concrete objectives to get there. You may be one of many who find themselves in a situation where your current plans have disappeared or been extremely impacted by the coronavirus.

This week we host our first webinar which will delve into Goals even more! You can register here for a free spot. 

Here is a guide to find your feet, and take the next clear steps towards that goal. The trick right now is to not overwhelm yourself with ALL the things you need to do or feel you should be doing. Start one at a time.  

Purpose – Where do you begin?

Let’s back up a little. Goals are there to get you closer to what you want in life – this goes for professional objectives as well. What we want to achieve at work is driven by the life we want to have. But what we want in life should come down to what makes us the person we want to be, what makes us content and happy, and gives us purpose. 

Goals are there to help us get closer to fulfilling our purpose. Before we set any plans, we need to understand what our purpose is. 

That idea itself ends up being quite scary. So reframe the idea that purpose is something that covers your whole life. You might be the type of person who naturally knows what you want to achieve in life and the mark you want to leave behind, but you also might have no idea. 

It can change and finding purpose evolves. The purpose I thought I had at 14 is entirely different from the one I have today. 

Mark Manson, in this great article, provides seven questions for finding purpose that you can ask yourself. Here are just a few of those questions for you to consider.  

What makes you forget to eat?

Consider the correlating factors in the times you have become so enthralled with what is going on, that you literally forget basic human functions – but hopefully not breathing. 

It may not be the specific activity you’re doing but the feelings surrounding it. Look at the subject matter, the way it makes you feel. Is it driving you to win or improve in some way, or is it the people you are with? Think of a few times where you have become so caught up in what’s happening that time melts away. Write down everything to see if you can spot some recurring themes. 

If you knew you were going to die one year from today, what would you do and how would you want to be remembered?

Sorry to go all morbid on you, but this is another really helpful question. As Mark puts it so well in his article:

Ultimately, death is the only thing that gives us perspective on the value of our lives. Because it’s only by imagining your non-existence that you can get a sense of what is most important about your existence.” – Mark Manson

Consider your legacy, and focus on the things in life that really matter. What are your values? What are your priorities in life? Purpose is about spending the limited time we have, well. 

That purpose provides us with goals. 

What’s your favourite flavour of s*** sandwich and does it come with an olive?

Even Mr Manson notes that this sounds pessimistic, but it’s so important to ask! Because even the things we want most in life require sacrifice and perseverance. There will be both bad and great times ahead. The question is, what sacrifice are you willing to tolerate? Your favourite ‘s*** sandwich’ is the one you are willing to eat to get to where you want to be. 

Hypothetically, say one of your key values or a purpose is health-driven, and you decide a goal is to be able to run a half marathon. But you have a demanding job or more responsibility at home, is the difference between reaching that goal or failing to get up an hour earlier every day to train? Can you tolerate an earlier wake-up call? 

If you want to start your own business but you already work full-time, do you need to say no to socialising? Can you build your dream in the evenings? 

Consider what you can tolerate in the pursuit of a purposeful goal.

How we’ve looked at finding purpose it’s time to…

Read Part Two: Ready, Set, Goal!